The Power of Company Culture

The Power of Company Culture
The Power of Company Culture Book Cover The Power of Company Culture
Chris Dyer
Business Culture
Kogan Page
2018

A lot is written about a company’s culture and the importance of trying to get it ‘right’, although maybe there is a perception that it can be artificially designed and implemented just as you can change internal decoration!
The culture of a company is essential, as the author of this book notes, with it affecting both its internal and external operations. It is pervasive and even addictive. Sometimes the smallest things can set a ‘spark’ that ignites a larger fire or a chain reaction. This book is different though, because it does not just sing the importance of getting the culture right within a company, but it debunks myths about so-called remarkable companies and their apparent exclusive status.
Through seven pillars of ‘culture success’, it is possible for any company to develop a culture that is a win-win for all, claims the author, backing up theoretical and practical insight with case studies and professional commentary from many executives who have been involved in developing company culture in major companies. These seven pillars are the author’s construction, being transparency, positivity, measurement, acknowledgement, uniqueness, listening and mistakes. The concept may sound on the face of it to be a little simplistic, but after reading through the book you can get a sense of the idea emerging, and its advice is not so revolutionary as to risk endangering your operations through a trial attempt. A lot of it may be just common sense, but then again common sense is often overlooked by many for some reason!
It is written for multiple audiences, so for some such as human resources personnel who may need to lead much of the change it can appear slightly simplified, but fortunately, it manages to keep the reader engaged even if they sometimes skip over ‘known ground’. It seems to achieve its objectives quite well, and its price means that it is hardly going to break the bank by checking it out and seeing if you gel with it or, at the very least, get even one modification out of it rather than the desired full draw.
Occasionally it was felt that some of the language and styling started to grate like a caricatured evangelist preacher or uncontrolled-enthusiast, but then it checked itself for a while and got back onto the script. This could, of course, just be a reflection of this reviewer’s own culture and response reaction. It was not a bad book, it raised some interesting points, and has the potential to lead to some change or development within your company: the size and scope of any adjustment may be based on your interpretation of the book and the capacity of the company to change!